Monday, 4 May 2015

Book Week 2015: Snail and Turtle are Friends

Book Week 2015
As August draws near teachers and librarians will have Book Week at the back of their minds. This is the first in a series of posts that will hopefully relieve the idea thinking and stress to have a starting point.

Snail and Turtle are Friends by Stephen Michael King is shortlisted by CBCA for the Early Childhood Book of the Year.

The story is about Snail and Turtle who are friends. They have things in common that they like to do but also like to do things that are different. This book embraces these differences to show that you don't have to be the same in everything in order to be friends.

http://www.craftymorning.com/turtle-craft-kids-using-wine-cork/
Michelle @ Crafty Morning has a simple tutorial on how to create these cute little turtles with just paper, paint, sharpies, and wine corks.


Literacy: Comparing characters 

Time: 2 x lessons (30-40 mins each)
(1 x painting, 1 x details and writing)

Objective:
To identify similarities, differences and common preferences between two characters

 Materials:
A4 cartridge paper (or cardboard since paint is being used), green and brown paint, sharpies (or thin-tip markers), wine corks.


How to:
- Use an A4 piece of paper do a turtle print as per Michelle's instructions on one side of the paper and a second in the middle section.

Divide the page in to three sections
This creates a Venn Diagram
- On the other side stamp a cork print with a different colour. Paint a body as well. Do the same in the middle section.

- Once dry mark on the details with the sharpies/markers

You now have a Venn Diagram and students can either write or draw to show their understanding of how Turtle and Snail are different.

- In the Turtle section they write/draw only what Turtle enjoys

- In the Snail section they write/draw only what Snail enjoys

- In the middle section with both Turtle and Snail they write what they both enjoy

This shows where Snail and
Turtle should be on the page.


Tip: If you are working with younger children I suggest getting them to fold the piece of paper into three sections first to help them space the pictures appropriately.

Wine corks: If you are having trouble locating wine corks in craft shops I suggest going to the nearest hotel. I have always found them to be really helpful supplying them for classroom use (just air them out for a bit to get rid of the smell!) 

https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B_KFkXp61byuRDd6RW1MM0ZNOHM/edit
Lyndsey @ A Year of Many Firsts has a worksheet available for free on her website that would suit older students for identifying the similarities/differences between them and a friend.


Literacy: Comparing friends

Time: 1 x 60 min lesson

Objective:
To identify similarities, differences and common preferences between two friends

https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B3q9lZGd46F0MTBmNDViZTktNDM0Zi00YWYzLThjNTctNzdiN2Y5N2YyZWI3/edit


Lauren @ Just Add Clipart has a blog entry about these creative ways to use a Venn diagram to compare similarities and differences between friends. She provides a template for the one on the left.


Literacy: Comparing friends

Time: 1 x 60 min lesson

Objective:
To identify similarities, differences and common preferences between two friends


http://www.wunderbare-enkel.de/natur-basteln/1295/schnecke-igel-und-tausendfuessler-aus-blattern
 Gro├čeltern & Enkel  posted this wonderful naturalist picture as a craft project.

Art: Creating art with natural and man-made materials


Time:1 x 60-80 min lesson

Objective:
To create an artwork using natural and man-made materials


Materials:
coloured cardboard in A4 size (if doing one character only or doing them back-to-back) or A3 coloured cardboard if doing both characters, paper, leaves, glue

How to:- First you will need to take the class outside to collect leaves in a variety of shapes and colours. You want the sizes to be fairly similiar though for the pattern

- Each student chooses their cardboard and lays out the leaves in a swirl pattern (as shown in the picture) for a snail or a layered pattern in a circular shape if doing the turtle.

- Once happy, glue the leaves down (a sudden gust of wind is your worst enemy)

- As the glue dries on the leaves the students can get on with making the body of the snail/feet, head and tail of the turtle to glue in place

- An added task would be to have the students write a paragraph explaining and justifying their choice of leaves to depict their specific character eg. I chose different shades of green and brown leaves for the turtle because that is what colour they have in the pet shop.

Tip: It should be obvious but make sure the students choose dry leaves - not wet ones!
http://www.readingconfetti.com/2013/05/kid-made-turtle-herb-planters.html
Lorie @ Reading Confetti has instructions on how to create a living character if you are looking for a science angle.

Time:
1 x 60 min lesson (turtle/snail pot)

Objective:
To demonstrate what plants need to survive



Materials:
small containers (jelly ones would work well), plastic plate for each student (to sit them on), measuring cup, bucket, spray bottle, water, soil, seeds, pompoms (turtle - both small and large), googly eyes (turtle), pipe cleaners (snail)

How to (Turtle):

- poke a hole in the bottom of each cup (best that the teacher does this, as a precaution to not split the base sticky a small piece of masking tape on before you bang the nail down or use a metal skewer).

- put the container on the plate (very important!) after it has been named

- fill container with soil (either do this by going to student to student with a bucket of soil and a measuring cup or have them come to you - but they might drop it if you do the latter)

- poke holes into soil (fingers will do) and place seeds in (a variety of different ones - about 5 different in a class of 25)

- glue on pompoms and eyes

- leave for 15 min before spraying lightly with water (this allows the glue a little drying time - could also wait until the end of the day to do it)

- put on a shelf near the window

How to (Snail):
- poke a hole in the bottom of each cup (best that the teacher does this, as a precaution to not split the base sticky a small piece of masking tape on before you bang the nail down or use a metal skewer).

- put the container on the plate (very important!) after it has been named

- fill container with soil (either do this by going to student to student with a bucket of soil and a measuring cup or have them come to you - but they might drop it if you do the latter)

- poke holes into soil (fingers will do) and place seeds in (a variety of different ones - about 5 different in a class of 25)

- use 6 pipe cleaners - twist the ends together of all six for about 1/4 of the length (this is the head).

- separate into two groups of 3 and twist together for another 2/4 approx (these need to wrap around either side of the pot

- twist last bit of all 6 together (fold any longer bits in so the tail doesn't look bigger than the head)

- shape head and glue on googly eyes



Tip: I bought a few sets of hard plastic plates from the cheap shop that I use for projects like this and other art related ones. They come in handy and it is a worthy investment as so far I haven't replaced any. They are similar to these pictured and cost about $2 for 4 from The Reject Shop.

 

https://www.pinterest.com/missjennyau/book-week-2015-books-light-up-our-world/


Click on the board cover to the left and Follow my Pinterest board for links, ideas and more for Book Week 2015

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